Food

A Dinner Party with Miya Folick

    Miya Folick’s music can’t be categorized by genre; part spacey alt-pop and part anthemic grunge rock, it could be more accurately described as a wholly atmospheric arrangement of sounds, all of which are consistently working to support Folick’s hypnotic vocal. Her voice is a powerhouse; she sings with the intensity and wisdom of a woman who has lived a thousand different lives. On her debut LP, Premonitions, her voice acts as an anchor as it lures you through a collection of soundscapes. Each song is uniquely and indecisively emotive; tracks often dance the line between light and introspective, or pleasing and brooding, in a way that’s realistic. Folick’s lyrics, pensive and relatable, add a level of accessibility to her sound when its emotional scale can be hard to gauge. Most of the time, though, her lyrics also encourage equivocation. This is because Folick writes about life the way she lives it: not searching for answers, but searching in general.

    On June 24, join Miya and The Wild Honey Pie for an unforgettable night of music and Mediterranean cuisine at Checker Hall. As a special bonus this time around we’re partnering with Slow & Low to give you complimentary specialty cocktails all night. Attendees get a delicious three-course meal, said free drinks and a performance by Miya Folick unlike any you’ve seen before. Made with straight rye whiskey, navel oranges, raw honey, Angostura bitters and a small dose of rock candy, #drinkslowandlow Rock & Rye is a refreshing burst of warm citrus flavor that’s ready to drink and ready to be shared. @drinkslowandlow is on Facebook and Instagram.

    “The Los Angeles singer seems bound for crossover status, with pop anthems that challenge power structures and embrace simple pleasures.” — Pitchfork

    “Her vocals have an overwhelming power when she truly lets loose, the sound of a storm brewing within then erupting from a human body.” — Stereogum

    “The songs are like cushions on a bed of nails, founded in hardship and brutality, but catching the listener in their emphatic arms.” — Los Angeles Times

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